All posts tagged: Travel Guide

Things To Do In Selangor: An Ideal Travel Guide

Looking for a peaceful holiday & away from the crowds of Kuala Lumpur? Consider Selangor! After staying in downtown Kuala Lumpur for a few nights, and comparing it with my time in the neighbouring state of Selangor, I realized that Kuala Lumpur was, after all, never meant for me. And if given a chance to revisit the Peninsular Malaysia, I’d like to uncover a bit more or Selangor, or perhaps the southwestern coast and the comparatively offbeat northeast. But for those who happen to be in Malaysia for just a few days and are bound to stay close to the Kuala Lumpur Airport, the state of Selangor, with its many offbeat locations, provides a great escape. Away from the urban centres, while still not very far, Selangor offers convenient travel options and a far refreshing scene of rural villages. Its serene coastline towards the west moreover promises a pleasant and a relaxing holiday. Fondly known as the “Gateway of Malaysia” Selangor offers many adventure experiences like rock climbing, paragliding, river rafting and bungy jumping, among others. …

How To Do Southeast Asia In 1 Month

Disclaimer: Before you make any opinions, please note that this post was written keeping two things in mind: one, travelling a maximum number of southeast Asian countries on a minimum budget. And two, doing it all quickly and still not hurrying too much between places. If Southeast Asia is world’s top backpacking location then there’s a reason for it. It is perfect for millennials, who neither have money, nor time. The kind of people falling in my category. Here, the visas are cheaper, or not required at all, travelling through one country and another is possible by land (even for the unfortunate Indians with their weak Indian passport), and flights to a few major airports cost as low as flying domestically in your country! And if you just happen to be someone who needs visas for Southeast Asia, please note that right now is even better to do so, because to increase the tourist inflow, Malaysia and Thailand have just cut slashed their visa costs, and they’re particularly focusing on the Indian market. [I’ve just grabbed …

Gujarat Travel Guide

When I was initially planning to backpack across Gujarat I’d no idea what to expect. People suggested that backpacking in Gujarat – particularly inside Kutch – won’t be a good idea. But it wasn’t the backpacking or travelling on my own, that I was worried about. A limited travel information available on Gujarat was the biggest challenge. Other than its few religious sites, a couple of national parks and the over-promoted Kutch festival (or the Rann Utsav), very little has been written or spoken about tourism in Gujarat. A few online travel guides moreover left me discouraged furthermore mentioning about Gujarat’s poor public transportation system. So before I start with my usual travel guide format, I’d give you a general overview and help you understand Gujarat better. The state of Gujarat has been divided into three parts: Saurashtra, Magadh and Kutch. Saurashtra and Magadh, does not have much to travel, at least if speaking for not-so-religious travel community. Other than Gir National Park (popular for spotting Asiatic Lion), all you’ll find here are a few historical sites including Somnath and Dwarka, and a few …

Seven Amazing Things To Do in Lonavala

The diverse land of Maharashtra offers plenty of opportunities for tourists to have a relaxing holiday. And if you live in or around Mumbai, Lonavala might just be a perfect place to have an easy escape from your daily bustling life. With an elevation of over 2,000 feet, and a wide range of activities like camping, waterfall rappelling, rock climbing, and trekking, among others, this place has something for everyone. Whether you’re an adrenaline junky or someone who only fancies cozying up and relaxing, be rest assured that Lonavala won’t let you return home unsatisfied. When I first visited Lonavala, with a group of friends, two years ago, I had no idea about what to expect. I thought even a weekend might feel too long there. But it turned out that Lonavala had too much to offer, and visiting Lonavala for only a day or two was a total injustice to the place. But whether you visit Lonavala for a day, a week, or a fortnight, these are the seven recommended things to do in …

How To Stay In Little Rann of Kutch For Free

When I was initially planning my trip to Gujarat, particularly around the Rann of Kutch region, I felt hopeless. Every place in the Rann of Kutch charged at least a couple of thousand Rupees for a night. And this did not include food. Some generous tourist homes, however, offered a complimentary breakfast but their price tag was way over my budget. “I’d never be able to travel to this part of my country, if I couldn’t find sponsors,” I remember wondering. The only option for me was to stay in the nearby towns of Bhuj and Gandhidham (yet both the places had no place of interest for a traveller like me) and do day trips to Great Rann of Kutch (GRK) and Little Rann of Kutch (LRK). But it didn’t sound feasible. At least not for someone who was backpacking and had to wait long hours hitchhiking thanks to an overwhelmingly poor public transportation system in the entire region of Kutch. Read: Kutch Travel Guide In order to explore the White Desert in the Great Rann …

Rann Utsav: NOT Worth The Effort, Distance And Money!

Organised annually by Gujarat Tourism, between November and February, the Rann Utsav of Kutch has been scaling popularity charts among Indian and foreign travellers alike, in the previous years. Though it’s surely an interesting effort allowing people to revisit the desert region of Kutch – which was left devastated by the 2001 earthquake – by creating a travel story linking to Kutch’s geographical and cultural distinctions, the value for money that it (the Rann Utsav) offers, however, is unfortunately pretty discouraging. To own a sleeping place (a Premium Tent, or a Rajwadi Bhunga, as named) that comes with complimentary meals and a one night/two days package, costs nearly 6 thousand Rupees per person (excluding 18% taxes). For every extra person, in the tent, you pay 4 thousand (and more taxes) extra. This means a family of three can end up paying over 15 thousand Rupees for one night in Rann Utsav. [Please check their website for updated prices] You can moreover buy longer-duration packages, which takes you to a few places in the nearby town …

A Backpacker’s Guide To Travel In Kutch

Kutch was never on my agenda, and little did I even know about it — except for the fact that savvy tourists often fly here in winter for spotting the rare migratory birds. But for a backpacker, Kutch had very little to offer. My fear (of Kutch not being a backpacking destination) moreover started haunting as soon as I arrived in Kutch. Local transport here suddenly became a rarity, and the long distance(s) from one tourist attraction to the other — totally unbelievable. I was spending more time standing on roads while trying to hitchhike, than seeing places. To disappoint you, even more, remember that during peak tourist season, finding an accommodation may moreover become a challenge, have you not done an advance booking. But despite all challenges, Kutch offers beautiful highlights. And the deeper you explore the region, the better it turns out to be. Sharing some of my first impressions of backpacking in Kutch, to help you plan your holiday better. Great Roads But A Disappointing Transport If there is one thing that impressed me …

Bodhgaya — What To Expect From The Birthplace Of Buddhism

The birthplace of Buddhism. The crucible of a new philosophy. The epitome of knowledge and compassion. That’s what Bodhgaya is! Located in the Gaya district, in the Indian state of Bihar, Bodhgaya is a tiny little town where Prince Siddhartha attained enlightenment beneath a Pipal tree, some 2500 years ago. In terms of blessedness, consider this tiny temple town for Buddhists what Mecca is to Muslims, or Varanasi to Hindus. Unsurprisingly, the town attracts thousands of Buddhist pilgrims from around the world, who come to prayer, study and meditate – with some in their flaming red robes, and other, in Turmeric and Saffron ones. Though of course, the most hallowed spot in Bodhgaya is the Bodhi tree which flourishes inside the Mahabodhi Temple complex, the many Buddhist monasteries and temples that mark its bucolic landscape, built in their national style by foreign Buddhist communities, are no less charming. Every country in the world, which has a Buddhist population, including Japan, Burma, Bhutan, and Nepal, among others, have erected their own version of a Buddhist monastery in Bodhgaya. And …

Where To Travel In India: My 9 Personal Faves From 2016

2016 turned out to be a promising year for my travelling stint. If the entire year put together, I think I spent more than 300 days on the road. I covered a part of Southeast Asia, a bit of Nepal and much of India (now only left with 6 Indian states, including Gujarat and Rajasthan, and they are next in the list). Where most of the places I visited were great, some were exceptionally better. Better in a way that they carried the essence of Indian culture, its diverse landscapes, and represented India as a wonderful destination to travel. So if I were to recommend any places from those I visited in India, in 2016, they would be… Alappuzha Backwaters, Kerala Alappuzha, also known as Alleppey, is home to a vast network of waterways and a few thousand houseboats. And the experience of sailing downs its interconnected lagoons and smaller canals while overlooking the paddy fields of succulent green, curvaceous rice barges and village life along the banks, is totally magical. You can also call it …

Introduction To Varanasi

When I first arrived in Varanasi, I had its most clichéd picture in mind: a group of people surrounding the burning pyres on a ghat, a few lost sadhus whitewashed in ash, and the daily Ganga Aarti. Though I knew that the town is more or less comprised of 80+ connected ghats, running to a length of almost 10 kilometres – visualizing Varanasi anything beyond a spiritual Indian town, was quite hard. During my first 15 minutes of arrival, I remember attesting it to the autorickshaw driver, that I’m finding Varanasi quite similar to Haridwar, or “Rishikesh without mountains”. I asked him if he has ever visited Uttarakhand. He rejected, in the most uninteresting manner. But as the time went past, and I thoughtfully overstayed in the town, one day after the other, I realised that Varanasi was perhaps not anything like Haridwar, or Rishikesh, or any other Indian town for that matter. After all, it is one of the world’s oldest continually inhabited place on earth – dwelling a civilization as old as 11th …