All posts tagged: Solo Travel

Why Bangkok Is An Ideal City For A First Time Solo Traveller

I stayed in Thailand for more than two weeks, travelled from north to south, and it had been a whirlwind experience. While I enjoyed most of its cities and towns and islands, nothing can compare my love for Bangkok. And I only imagine there will be more tributes to Bangkok, especially when I will be back in India and have the chance to reminisce and write more. I encourage everyone to visit Bangkok, particularly those who’re new to the idea of long-term solo travelling. And it shouldn’t take that much persuasion, after all, Bangkok has been named as one of the world’s best cities to travel to, for many years in a row, and there is a reason for it. In fact, there are many reasons. Read: How To See Bangkok In 3 Days From world-class food to nature parks to party places, Bangkok leads in everything. Though some people do complain that it is too noisy, I think my Indian dispositions helped me blend in fairly easily. In only a few hours after I …

Why I Quit My Job To Travel

Last week, I took a wee trip to Rishikesh – the land of sadhus and of many people’s spiritual rebirth. I have a personal affection, some attachment to this place. This is where I once spent two months, practising meditation and taking spiritual lessons. But this time, my arrival was accompanied by a sense of unexpected realization. I wondered, as I grabbed myself walking along its frenzied, confused walkways, that how lucky I am to experience places like Rishikesh again and again. And yet, it is never the climax of my journey. It is always the beginning. “We travel, some of us forever, to seek other places, other lives, other souls” Anais Nin It has been a few years now since I have been travelling full time, or I should perhaps say a few years since I’ve made travelling my life, and my source of income, yet I never shared here why and how it all happened. It would be nice to say that I wanted to understand myself and find my inner consciousness, but frankly speaking, it’s …

How Solo Travelling Is Better

People have been solo travelling the world for decades – chasing the unknown, all under the company of their own solitude. There is some excitement in it. Some addiction. Feeling a bout of the jitters while planning where to head next, without having anyone to hold you back or someone to count on, is a kind of adventure in itself! I remember the first time I travelled on my own, I had no intention of doing it. I was desperately looking for a partner – calling, texting everyone I knew, hoping someone would tag along. But I found no one. It seemed everyone was busy sorting out their lives, or perhaps saving their holiday to celebrate the new year at the crowded beaches of Goa. To hell with, I had to leave alone. And I think it was the best thing that happened to me. No, I am not saying it out of ego. I am saying it because that’s how I got into solo travelling – out of helplessness. And as I completed one solo journey, …

Why I Want To Travel Bhutan Again

Of all the places I’ve been to, Bhutan remains one of my favourites. Not much is known of this country, and even less is heard about. No wonder, Bhutan is a place to be discovered. Many people find it hard to sample its charms due the country’s high daily tariff (about $250 per day per person) and complicated visa requirements – which, fortunately enough, don’t apply to Indian tourists. We can cross the border anytime we want and enjoy its warmth, humility, friendliness and spiritual peace, like a backpacker. But why do I care to visit it again? Well, of all the compelling reasons Bhutan’s ‘Restaurants Cum Bars’ – as they are often named – are something I find myself mostly yearning for. They are a basic Bar like facility where you can enjoy ‘Emma Dhatsi’ – an insanely hot delicacy of boiled chillies and local cheese – and all those local beers and whiskeys. For a start remember that they are in no shortage in any sense. If Bhutan has some 100,000 shops in total, …

A Walk Into The Himalayan Woods

Travelling alone has its own benefits. It gives you that control where you can set an itinerary and then you can ditch it. Spending days in solitude also makes you more eager to chat with locals, absorb their culture and team up with them to make your journey more interesting. And that is exactly what happened to me when I was on my way to trek all the way to Deo Tibba. Deo Tiba is basically a 4 to 7 days trek depending upon how far you want to go. The base camp takes 7 days. The elegant Deo Tiba peak which is 6001 m high looks like half oval shaped egg. The journey starts from Jagatsukh village (about 20 kms from Manali), in a motorcar, followed by a great deal of walking through Himalaya’s pristine and untouched beauty, laced with the amazing forests and snow-clad peaks. But let’s not waste too much time speaking about its specifications, because we aren’t even going there. So as I said, travelling alone has its own benefits. And this journey just proved me …