All posts tagged: Solo Travel

Fear of Unknown. How To Deal With It As A Solo Traveller

The most common reply I get every time I talk to someone about my nomadic lifestyle is that they wish they could do it too. People tell me about their solo travel dreams, and share the fantasies of being a solo backpacker somewhere in Amsterdam, then they come up with common excuses as to why they can’t realise them: They fear they will feel bored alone. They fear it’s not safer for them as a woman. They fear their parents won’t allow. Fear. It’s what keeps us from living our dreams and doing what we’d always wanted to do. I remember when I’d initially decided to quit my job to travel (& I’m not asking you to do so), I was equally scared, as I was while leaving for my first ever indefinite backpacking trip to Bhutan. And two years later, even today, as I plan a trip, or worse, find myself standing behind the exit door of my home in New Delhi, or inside a railway station in another city, I feel no less scared …

Solo Female Travel Tips – Getting Started

This is a guest post by Neetole Mitra of Living Unplanned, who quit her job 4 months ago and has been travelling ever since, alone. Encouraging more females to follow the league, this is what she has to say… It’s surprising that so many of us love to travel yet so few actually do it. It almost makes one wonder, if travel is ultimately as coveted as everyone would have you believe. I mean, if people really want to travel, why don’t they? Travel has become a benchmark of sorts for ‘freedom’. It’s what we say/think every day. I wish I could be free. Just get the hell out of here. Go where I want to. Etc. But we are free. As long as there’s no literal chain holding us back, we are all free. Yet, most of us create alibis for ourselves. I can’t travel because there’s no money. I can’t travel because I have to take care of the family. Because it’s not safe. All of them completely sound barriers that hold us back …

How I Deal With Language Barrier While Travelling

I remember when I was leaving for my first solo trip I was more doubtful than ever. I couldn’t decide a thing. I thought I was unprepared. I was scared and I feared I won’t be able to survive for long. And such fears are only natural. Travelling alone for the first time can be doubtful. It forces us to overthink. Would it be safe? Would the journey be interesting? What would people think? People have all kind of doubts. Last week, a reader asked me on Facebook if his language can make his solo travelling in North of India, tough. He belonged from the South. In his words “Is language a barrier for travelling? I was planning to travel the north of India next year but I don’t know Hindi. Can it be a problem? PS: I am travelling solo!” “PS I am travelling solo” — his message ended with the most important consideration! A solo traveller is always scared of a new language, not until he has experienced a few solo journeys before. I …

4 Women Who Conquered Common Beliefs To Travel The World

A few months ago, while backpacking through Southern India, I met a group of college students who were out, holidaying. They found it interesting that I’m a full time traveler, and that I’d quit my job to do it. During our short conversation, one among the 3 girls in the group, asked, if I ever found solo travelling risky. A few assuring points, from my side, and she whispered, sounding unconvinced, “Yeah, but women traverse a different world than men do”. I think I couldn’t understand her at that time. I think can’t understand her now. When it comes to solo travelling and women, things becomes a little complicated. Women have to deal with a complete different set of anxieties. Some fear for safety, some for public opinion. “You get a lot of unwanted attention,” someone once wrote me in comments. And I couldn’t agree more. Travelling as a woman can be tough. No one can deny this fact. But I’ve met an uncountable numbers of women, in different parts of the world, and in my country, …

Why I Travel Solo

“So when are we leaving? What days have you applied for a leave, at your workplace?” I asked my friend Alok, with whom I was trying to partner up in a few-week long motorbike expedition in Himalayas. A long silence at his end was a clear invitation to realise that the deal is cancelled. “No man, the thing is I might not be coming along, something really urgent has come up,” he confessed, in his usual tone. This happened yesterday, and since last 24 hours, I’m constantly consoling him to reconsider, like a stubborn, innocent kid, trying to make him realise what he will miss, if he doesn’t come along. None of my friends wants to replace him either – everyone is busy with their work, sorting their lives in an ever systematic order. “The man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait until that other is ready” Henry David Thoreau And then I realised it’s the same pattern that has been repeating over the years. Though some people …

12 Travel Goals To Accomplish Before 30

I hate bucket lists. The whole idea of penning down name of places and then pursuing them, one by one, never intrigued me. It doesn’t suit us backpackers lot, either. The real charm of travelling is only when you set off to a place, the minute you find yourself intrigued by it, not two years from now. Because two years from now, that place might still be there, but its originality, its vibe, will totally be washed away, or at least, altered. So, I hate bucket lists. I think they’re crap. Also, as a hungry nomad, there’s no place in the world where I don’t want to be. But I think there are some places, some experiences, that I want to see (or try out) sooner or later. They’re more like priorities. And to keep a tab on them, I’m writing my travel priorities (not a bucket list!) for the next 4 years, in order to stay focused. 12 travel goals to accomplish before I turn 30: Complete The Appalachian Trail Ever since I’ve read the book on …

Why Bangkok Is An Ideal City For A First Time Solo Traveller

I stayed in Thailand for more than two weeks, travelled from north to south, and it had been a whirlwind experience. While I enjoyed most of its cities and towns and islands, nothing can compare my love for Bangkok. And I only imagine there will be more tributes to Bangkok, especially when I will be back in India and have the chance to reminisce and share stories with others. I encourage everyone to visit Bangkok, particularly those who’re new to the idea of long-term solo travelling. And it shouldn’t take all that much persuasion, after all Bangkok has been named as one of the world’s best cities to travel, for many years in a row, and there is a reason for it. In fact, there are many. [Read: How To See Bangkok In 3 Days] From food, to people, to a killer nightlife Bangkok leads in everything. Though some people do complain that it is too noisy, I think my Indian dispositions helped me blend in fairly easily. In only a few hours after I …

Why I Quit My Job To Travel

Last week, I took a wee trip to Rishikesh – the land of sadhus and of many people’s spiritual rebirth. I have a personal affection, some attachment to this place. This is where I once spent two months, practicing meditation and taking spiritual lessons. But this time, my arrival was accompanied by a sense of unexpected realization. I wondered, as I grabbed myself walking along its frenzied, confused walkways, that how lucky I am to experience places like Rishikesh again and again. And yet, it is never the climax of my trip. It is always the beginning. “We travel, some of us forever, to seek other places, other lives, other souls” Anais Nin It has been more than two years now, since I quit my job and started travelling, yet I never shared here why and how it all happened. It would be nice to say that I wanted to understand myself, and find my inner consciousness, but frankly speaking, it’s not true. The only part which is true is that I’ve had enough living the same boring 9 …

Concluding Video For My 9-Day Long Solo Road Trip To Spiti Valley

It takes a certain amount of madness to drive on Spiti Valley’s uninviting, mesmerizing landscapes. And to do it solo, you need to be more than just mad. When I decided to drive through this unfamiliar terrain – home to one of the ‘world’s deadliest roads’ – my sole intention was to see Spiti’s natural vistas and experience local and indigenous cultures.Here, a 2-minute video of my very recent Solo Bike Expedition To Spiti Valley. And brace yourself for many such journeys to come… Also See: A One Minute Video Of My Camping-Site-In-Making, In Chandratal Subscribe to my Youtube channel, for more travel videos. 

How Solo Travelling Is Better

A lot has been written about solo travelling. Travelers from around the world are doing this from decades. Chasing the unknown, all under the company of their own solitude. There is some excitement in it. Some addiction. Feeling a bout of the jitters while planning where to head next – is a kind of adventure in itself. I remember the first time I traveled on my own, I had no intention of doing it. I was desperately looking for a partner – calling, texting everyone I knew – hoping someone would tag along. But nope. It seemed everyone was busy, trying to save their holidays for the last month of the year, as if they all wanted to spend them, almost uselessly, struggling to be a part of crowded beaches in Goa, chasing beautiful girls and getting wasted, drinking alcohol. To hell with, I had to go alone. And it was perhaps the best thing that happened. No, I am not saying it out of ego. I am saying it because I got into solo travelling by …