All posts tagged: Cheap Travel

9 Ways To Travel Smarter And Cheaper

When I tell people that I’ve been travelling for the past two years, without having any source of steady income, they frown upon me, and ask, without sparing a second, “Then how do you fund your travels? You must be rich.” People think travelling is an expensive hobby. They think it is only possible to travel,or travel repeatedly, if you either earn in an impressive figure, or your father was hopelessly wealthy. In my case, neither were true. Perhaps that’s why, when I’d initially told my friends, two years ago, that I am quitting my job to travel, they couldn’t believe me. A few asked, if I’d won a lottery.  Sure travelling costs money. But if you do it the right way, you might not need much of it. For example three weeks in Cambodia should take no more than US $ 350. Similarly two weeks in Thailand should be travelled in under US $280. And then travelling cheap doesn’t mean living in bad conditions. If you go for local experiences, or look for something beyond the traditional way …

How To Find Cheap Accommodation When You Travel

Often when people ask me how I manage to travel so cheap, they point out the cost of accommodation and say it’s simply not possible. “You did a road trip to Spiti Valley, for 9 days, in under 5000 rupees? Where the hell did you sleep man? Under the stars?” – Yes that’s where I slept. In my tent. And under the stars. I save most of my money on travelling because of two reasons: I eat anything, and I sleep anywhere. Don’t take it literally, but the idea I am trying to convey is that I always look for a cheap deal, and that’s how I survive. I avoid hotels, and I say no to luxury resorts, because of how much they cost. Moreover when you barely be in for most of the day – there is no point in paying a 1000 Rupee bill, and bleed unnecessary money. So I stick to the other side of the spectrum: I stay in hostels, dormitories, tents and pretty much everywhere else which is pocket friendly. …

How Much It Costs To Travel In Cambodia?

A lot many people, before I tested the country myself, proposed that Cambodia is going to be a cheap deal. They would ostentatiously boast how easy it was for them to survive a day in under US $20. “But $20 a day is not cheap,” I’d say to myself. Sure it’s not too bad, but when back home you’re dealing with a currency which is 70 against a dollar (1 USD ≈ 70 Indian Rupees), it’s inevitable for you to moan a little on a daily 20 dollar bill. 10 dollars a day would have sounded better. I mean, Cambodia is not a kind of place you expected or wanted to be on a luxury holiday. You must be able to travel here on almost no money at all, after all that’s why you decided to come here at first place. But managing your accounts can be tricky in Cambodia – for the country has everything seemingly available for a minimum bill of “JUST ONE DOLLAAAAAR” – as Cambodians often quote. A shared ride in Tuktuk …

Top Money Saving Tips To Travel In Cambodia

Cambodia can be a cheap country to travel, if only you know how to keep a right approach and deal with locals the right way. During my travel, I met a few backpackers who were spending over 50 dollars a day, despite living much lavishly. They had no idea where they’re bleeding money. The problem was, they were Europeans, travelling in one of the poorest economies in Asia, with every local eye being set on their bank account. Travelling does not have to be expensive, particularly not if you’re travelling in a country like Cambodia. I travelled for 20 days here and spent no more than an average of $10 per day (read more about it here). What I did differently? I followed these 7 money saving tips: Negotiate the right price Just like any other Southeast Asian countries, negotiation is a daily affair in Cambodia. Expect literally no one telling you the fair price of a product here – particularly those products that are priced for 1 dollar. For a rule of thumb, remember that …

Hitchhiking From Leh To Srinagar

Hitchhiking has always remained an intriguing travel option to me. This is because of two fair reasons: one, it makes your journeys cheaper; second, it opens the possibilities to meet all the interesting people out there whom you otherwise miss by travelling in a bus, or far worse, in a private car. I’ve hitchhiked almost everywhere I’ve traveled in the world –  from Indian Himalayan roads to Bangkok’s highways. And no, I don’t find it risky. In my belief, the fact that hitchhiking is dangerous has only been overplayed by the fear-mongering society. So let’s not even go there! The idea to hitchhike all the way from Leh to Srinagar – a 420 km long and isolated road with some of the most popular towns in between, including Kargil and Dras (second coldest inhabited place on earth) – initiated when I met David and Marion on a chilly evening in Leh. And we teamed up to see if that’s even possible. Our shabby and hopeless scheme – as it seemed at first – started in Leh, and …