All posts filed under: Europe

Day Trip To Lake Bled, Predjama Castle & Postojna Cave, From Ljubljana

Slovenia may seem like a tiny little country sandwiched between between nations from all its four directions, but it’s not. At least not when you think of all the beauty it holds. Throughout my 4 day stay in Slovenia, I was amazed by its diversity, and the experiences it had to offer. From serene lakes to gigantic cave parks to medieval towns — tell me what Slovenia doesn’t have. Nothing! But out of all the places of interest three highlights that complete your trip in Slovenia are Lake Bled, Postojna Cave, and the Predjama Castle. Located at only an hour’s drive from Ljubljana, it is fairly easy to explore all three places in one day, but only if you’ve your own car, given that the lake Bled is located in an opposite direction from Postojna Cave and Predjama Castle. And since I’d only a day to spare, and didn’t want to rent a car and drive in solitude, I carefully chose a company called The Roundabout, which runs day trips from Ljubljana and Zagreb, and explored …

Metelkova District: Graffiti Art In The Streets Of Ljubljana

Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia, has always been a mystery for its visitors. Not many people travelling here have an idea what to expect, and I was no different. But as I arrived in Ljubljana, I realized that it was a town meant only to be loved. With its rich riverside café culture, and an old world European charm, it turned out to be unlike many other places I visited in Europe. But while the overwhelming charm and a chilled out vibe of Ljubljana Old Town enchants visitors, there is also an entirely different side to this fascinating city, which sometimes doesn’t. And you explore it as soon as you walk past the old historic heart, and enter into a shabby area of Metelkova, but of course, with a difference. Where graffiti, in many places, is considered, and even appear to be, a symbol of vandalism, in Ljubljana’s graffiti area the case was rather the contrary. Here it looked more like an art form. At Metelkova City artistic space, Ljubljana’s own graffiti area, several weird and wonderful …

Vienna On A Budget

A city of culture, history, music and art, with a night life to rival with that of any city in the world, that’s what Vienna is, in a nutshell. Walking through its many fairytale-like streets you wonder if there can be a place so royal and majestic in its appearance. No wonder, Vienna deserves its nickname The Imperial City, fairly well. But where on one side every experience, every sight in the city, is a total treat, the cost of travelling here — whether you talk about a 10 Euro cup of coffee, or a 150 Euro ballet performance — can feel overwhelming, especially if you’re travelling on a budget. But that doesn’t mean that it’s impossible to fill yourself up with the city’s history and culture, without having to spend too much. Because with my #ViennaNow budget travel guide, you can explore Vienna on budget. Here’s how… [Also Read: What To See And Do In Vienna] Arriving In The City If you’re flying into Vienna, the best and the cheapest way to get to the city centre is by taking the S-Bahn …

Budapest: In Pictures

I have so much to write from my recent trip to Europe, that even after writing a dozen stories, it looks like I’ve just scratched the surface of it. Sure two months was a good amount of time to get an idea of what travelling in Europe is like, but it was sure not enough — especially if you want to understand the culture and history of a place. And when we’re talking about places like Budapest, things become even tougher — for Budapest, and Hungary at large, has a rich history associated to it. However, during a total of 7 day period (the time I stayed in Budapest), I still managed to learn a bit about it, even if from a very shallow perspective. So I thought of putting up at least one pictures post on Budapest where I can tell some stories via the pictures. Here you go… A view of the city divided by the River Danube. Pest on the right side and Buda on the left. These two cities were merged …

Gardens Of Villa d’Este, in Tivoli

The hilltop town of Tivoli, back in time, may just be a summer retreat for ancient Romans, but today, it is home for two UNESCO World Heritage sites: Villa Adriana, the sprawling estate of Emperor Hadrian; and the 16th-century Villa d’Este, a Renaissance villa famous for its landscaped gardens and lavish fountains. During my two week workawaying in Italy, near Rome, I happened to explore the old city of Tivoli, and in Tivoli, perhaps the most surreal gardens I’ve seen in my life. Villa d’Este, as I had imagined (after watching its glimpse in the Hollywood movie Lizzie McGuire) to be grand, majestic and awe-inspiring. But it turned out to be something more than that, something far magical and unrealistic. The detailed Villa d’Este dates from the mid 16th century when Cardinal Ippolito d’Este decided to make changes to the convent he was given, upon his appointment as the governor of Tivoli, Italy. A member of an influential family and a lover of the finest things in life, d’Este commissioned his architect to build a new, grand residence filled with everything that money could buy and from what …

What To See In Budapest, And How

Nesting in the heart of Europe, Budapest offers its visitors an unlimited treasury of experiences. Budapest is one of those European metropolis,  popular for its wealth of sights, sounds and experiences. And what makes it better is that the city has something for everyone — from good food to charming architecture, to world-famous spas. In fact,the city has so much to offer that visitors — especially those travelling for a short time and looking for offbeat experiences — often get so much peckish during their visit that they feel overwhelmed about what to choose and what not. And if so is the case with you too and you’re in Budapest for only for a few nights (give Budapest at least three days, as less than that would be a total injustice to the city), here’s how I’d suggest you to plan your trip: Before Anything… Welcome to Budapest! Home to world-famous artists, mouth-watering food, and above all — cheap beer! I personally favor the city over other neighboring capital towns including Ljubljana (in its west), as well as …

Exploring The Iconic Budapest Metro

The Hungarian National museum, if you want to see it all, appear to be much bigger and overwhelming than you can imagine. A long stretch of art and artifacts and centuries old history. Don’t plan to see and absorb it all, in a day, just like I did. You need more time than that. And then certainly not plan an evening show in the city’s Opera House later, the same day — something that I ended up doing, again. I remember my second day in Budapest was long and tiring. I mean the city had too much to offer, and I had only a week to explore it all. But the good thing about Budapest was an efficient public transport, and among its public transport system is the Underground Metro System, that is not just beautiful and iconic, but has a long history associated to it. Yes, we are talking about the history that takes you back in 19th century — when Budapest, or the entire European continent, at large, got its first metro line. In many cities, the underground commute involves boring …

How To See Prague In One Day

Prague is one of those destinations that always seems to be in vogue. It’s been on the tourist map for a long time, and the crowds show no signs of abating — particularly when it comes to women. And I understand the fascination. Prague is, after all, gorgeous; has a Vegas-style nightlife; and speaks about, from its all nooks and corners, a hint of romance. But where on one side, the city is beautiful and vibrant, its well-preserved medieval city is abundant of rich history and stories. In fact, there is just so much to see and absorb here that if you’re staying here for only a few days, you’re going to miss a lot, unless you plan better, so read ahead my one day Prague Travel Guide. And since I stayed in Prague for only 3 days, out of which, I spent a day in the Bohemian and Saxon Switzerland Park, I was short of time too. So very carefully, I opted for a full-day guided tour around the city for I did not want to leave …

Vienna: In Pictures

Before anything, I confess that Vienna wasn’t on the original travel itinerary during my backpacking trip across Europe. Its ‘old people city’ charm was, in fact, the demotivation. I mean why would a 20-something solo traveller would want to visit an European town where all he can expect is an overdose of imperial grandeur of the Habsburg-era. But as an invitation from ViennaTourism landed in my inbox, recommending me a ballet performance and a guided tour in world’s one of the historical and most reputable horse riding schools, I thought, “Why Not!” The next thing I remember was booking a whirlwind trip to Vienna (from Prague) — and spending three days just wandering around its many royal and imperial streets. It turned out that walking around the city was one of the best things to do — because Vienna is drenched in incredible architecture. And now that I’ve concluded my visit to this royal city, I thought of putting up at least one picture post on Vienna where I can tell some stories via pictures. So here we go… …

Bohemian And Saxon Switzerland Park

I always admire beautiful and distinct landscapes. Landscapes that put me in a moment of awe, and offer me a sense of wonderment, even if for a fraction of second. And it was one of those days as I happened to explore a part of the Bohemian and Saxon Switzerland Park and walked along its many giant sandstone cliffs and steep canyons. Before anything, I’d like to clear out that the Bohemian and Saxon Switzerland Park is, in no way, a part of Switzerland. It got its name in the 18th century, when two Swiss artists called it Saxon Switzerland, as it reminded them of the landscape back home in Switzerland. Straddling between the Czech and German border, the park is divided, almost evenly, between the two countries, with just a slightly bigger portion of it falling on the German side (where it’s known as the Saxon Switzerland Park) and the remaining in the Czech Republic (where it’s known as Bohemian Switzerland National Park). Amazingly, the two countries work together to manage and protect the entire region, and you barely find a difference between the landscape and its sheer …