All posts filed under: Travel Photography

Budapest: In Pictures

I have so much to write from my recent trip to Europe, that even after writing a dozen stories, it looks like I’ve just scratched the surface of it. Sure two months was a good amount of time to get an idea of what travelling in Europe is about, but it was sure not enough – especially if you want to understand the culture and history of a place. And when we’re talking about places like Budapest, things become even more tougher – for Budapest, and Hungary at large, has a rich history associated to it. However, during a total of 7 day period (the time I stayed in Budapest), I still managed to learn a bit about it, even if from a very shallow perspective. So I thought of putting up at least one pictures post on Budapest where I can tell some stories via the pictures. Here you go… A view of the city divided by the River Danube. Pest on the right side and Buda on the left. These two cities were …

Exploring The Iconic Budapest Metro

The Hungarian National museum, if you want to see it all, appear to be much bigger and overwhelming than you can imagine. A long stretch of art and artifacts and centuries old history. Don’t plan to see and absorb it all, in a day, just like I did. You need more time than that. And then certainly not, plan an evening show in the city’s Opera House later, on the same day – something that I ended up doing, again. I remember my second day in Budapest was long and tiring. I mean the city had too much to offer, and I had only a week to explore it all. But the good thing about Budapest was an efficient public transport, and among its public transport system is the Underground Metro System, that is not just beautiful and iconic, but has a long history associated to it. Yes, we are talking about the history that takes you to 19th century – when Budapest, or the entire European continent, at large, got its first metro line. In many cities, the underground commute involves boring line …

A Photojourney To Sangla Valley And Chitkul

During my solo bike trip to Spiti Valley, I ended up in a town called Chitkul. It was more than 40 kilometres off the route. One side. But I could not stop myself from bifurcating. After all, it was “The Must See Camping Place, in Himalayas” as many people, whom I’d met on the journey, recommended. “Don’t forget to go to Chitkul man, Sangla Valley is so beautiful you won’t believe your eyes,” said a guy from Bangalore, as he threw another mug of water on his over-pampered Bullet 350. “Classic”, as he always pointed out, with a pause. Situated around 40 km from Karcham, Chitkul comes under Sangla Valley, which is spread over a tiny land of 20 kms. And when it comes to Himalayas, 20 kms seem even tinier. But if you speak about its beauty, each sight is a magnificent sight to behold. Snow clad mountains surround you and welcome you with a spectacular view of The Kinner Kailash. On the left lies the Sangla Valley, and on the right, the Baspa Valley. …

Charanag – Just Another Town, Across The Mountains

When you’ve been traveling for long enough, you start calculating the benefits. You wonder whether your travels have made you a better person, and whether all these journeys, that you’ve so far taken, have given you a deeper understanding of yourself – from within, and without I found myself pondering over such infinite and boundless thoughts as I decided to stay yet another day in Charanag – a small village in Himachal, secluded from the-road-much-taken towards Manali – where I ended up being the (only) tourist in the entire town. Though in my mind I’ve always been a drifter, it’s places like these, that slow down my movement. As I wandered through its small, cosy alleys it struck me that going slow, and sometime going nowhere at all, and just sitting still – killing every minute as it approaches you, with a new challenge – is the best of all joys. And here, in places like these, you find that joy. The joy in sitting still. In studying locals, and following their cultural routine to each days …

A Photo Journey Through Spiti Valley: Amongst World’s Most Beautiful Landscapes

Isolated and wild from inside out, as it appears – the journey to Spiti Valley will take you to the roads less traveled, literally! It is “The Middle Land” between India and Tibet, and much of it is either inhospitable or unexplored. Life here is tough and a little less ordinary, perhaps that’s why every moment spent here has its own significance. [Also Read: My Solo Bike Expedition To Spiti And How I Did It In Less Than 5K Rupees] A cold desert, a raging river, few rugged and narrow roads, and many uninviting trekking routes – no wonder Spiti Valley has no charm for a weakling.   It is said that the journey is more exciting than the destination itself. And when you’re here, you understand that well. Driving for long hours of a day, counting each mile is no less than a thrilling experience. It is something that every adventurer dreams of. The Majestic Key Monastery with a vainglorious mountain range trying to address its authority. Come to this barren land and you’d find nature ruling over every bit …

Kanyakumari: Life In A Day (In Pictures)

At the southernmost part of India is located the town of Kanyakumari, where India concludes its boundaries, almost gracefully, surrounded by the mighty and endless Arabian Sea, the Indian Ocean, and the Bay of Bengal – from all its directions. Known for its mesmerizing sunrises and sunsets, Kanyakumari entertains hundreds of Indian tourists flocking in everyday. But when it comes to the life of locals who are living here, everything becomes much usual and far more ordinary. Here, life in Kanyakumari in a day, for tourists and locals, alike: 5:50AM The city wakes up, as dawn starts breaking over the horizon, shell pink and faintly gold. 8:00AM A bunch of tourist figuring their way in Devi Kanya Kumari Temple – looking all but a little confused. 9:00AM Little boy chasing his dreams, or perhaps shaping them, by taking inspiration from the majestic and the endless sea. 12:00PM A street seller awaiting his first customer of the day, during the wee hours of the noon. 12:00PM “He is very intelligent, always choose the correct card,” says a tarot card reader, trying to persuade me, as a tourist. …

Life In The Backwaters Of Alleppey, Kerala

Tourists in their fancy houseboats seemed high in spirit, with their impressive camera doing most of the work. But in the local ferry, the atmosphere was rather regular. Here, no one appeared to be in hurry or amazed by the arresting beauty of the backwaters in Alleppey – one of the prime highlights of tourism in Kerala. I heard a lot about the backwaters of Kerala. I heard that tourists here hire a floating houseboat and wander through its maze of interconnected lagoons, canals, lakes and inlets – home to a dazzling assortment of flora and fauna, and local villages. I heard that they spend days sitting on the deck, experiencing the tranquility of this place, with a book in their hand, while swiftly sailing through one village to the other. I wanted to explore this place too, but my own way. And here I was, in a government ferry, surrounded by a bunch of locals who were heading back from the mainland of Alleppey, with all the ration they needed, and a newspaper that they’d …

Majuli Island: In Photos

My first sight of Majuli island (as you can see in the photos below) was on a humid afternoon in June when I arrived on the morning ferry from the city of Johrat. For about ten minutes, the adjoining land was aswarm with activity as people poured forth from the ferry to find a place in the already waiting sharing jeeps and buses, and made their way into one of the many small towns of Majuli. Then abruptly all became silence and I found myself left behind, wandering through the empty shores – waiting for another ferry to arrive and share a jeep with its people. This is how my unforgettable journey to this surreal, almost magical place began.  Soon, its pristine beauty left me startled, craving to stay there for ever. Let’s walk on a photo tour to know more about this place. To reach Majuli Island you are required to cross the Brahmaputra River in a ferry (or in a comparatively small boat) full of people, cattle, cars and what not. No it’s not like travelling …

Nongriat, Meghalaya: In Photos

“This north-east Indian village with root bridges is by far the best place I’ve seen in your country.” I still remember how my friend expressed his excitement, as we clambered over the lofty and vainglorious mountains of Uttarakhand, last year. His voice – a perfect invitation for me to amble – kept reverberating in my head for a long time until when I finally set off to see this place with a few other north-east Indian places that turned out to be no less than a Shangri-la. From being a place where it (almost) rains the most in the world to being a home to one of the amazing tribal community in India – there are many reasons why you should visit Nongriat. But the undisputed highlights are its lush forest, magnificent valleys, countless natural pools, living root bridges and the Bananas with seeds. Here, some unforgettable moments I clicked in and around Nongriat (eastern Khasi Hills): The entire east Khasi Hills in Meghalaya is like a secluded oasis of silence in the vastness of nature. And Nongriat – …